Employee engagement scores have hit an all-time high, according to a recent Gallup Poll, reaching a mere 34% of employees. An interesting correlation can be found when looking into studies that show only 37% of employees know their company’s purpose. I’m confident that leaders have to shift from implementing employee engagement initiatives toward cultivating a feeling of fulfillment in their employee’s everyday work experience.

Employee fulfillment is the new employee engagement.

 When we surveyed over 1,500 employees at TCC, one of the nation’s largest Verizon retailers and 93% of them stated that the Culture of Good gave them a sense of fulfillment in their everyday work, I knew we had something special. Much effort went into building this culture that brought fulfillment, and the following three moves were among them.

We Stopped Hiding Behind The “Charity Check”

We gave resources directly to our employees to fuel their efforts to do good in their communities. We have all seen the charity check used as a way for top leaders in an organization to donate to a charity while taking a pic for a press release. Although the initial intention may be pure, it falls short in terms of the desired impact. Employees aren’t going to feel fulfilled merely working for an organization whose leaders seem to care optically. True fulfillment comes when employees are given the means to follow their value for doing good while at work in ways that fuel their passions.

We Gave Everyone Permission To Care

Every leader, every manager, and all staff at every layer knew they had permission to care for their peers, customers, and their community in authentic ways. Rather than plugging in a CSR program that lessens in effect over time, we embedded what we called a Culture of Good into the everyday work of each employee. We worked hard to ensure all stakeholders knew how what they did every day (tasks) aligned with why they did it (higher purpose). In doing so, everyone knew they were driving the business to greater success while motivated by having more significant opportunities to do good.

We Told Compelling Stories To Inspire Positive Action

We formed storytelling teams by selecting those skilled in telling captivating stories that could inspire others to join in the good all were doing. We adopted the mantra: “We should never do good to be seen, but we should always be seen doing good.” In doing so, we shifted from a bragging mentality toward one of inspiration. This authentic endeavor allowed for an internal and external communication plan that multiplied our efforts and afforded employees with a feeling of belonging to something bigger than themselves, and deep-rooted their belief that they could live their passion in the workplace.

 It’s hard to argue with results, so we built a solution called our Culture of Good in a Box to replicate this simple, scalable culture in any size organization. If you’ve ever asked, “Is there a playbook for our organization to enhance our workplace culture?” The answer is now, “Yes!”

Look into our Culture of Good in a Box solution for your organization.

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